Scientists create microscopic ROBOTS made from human cells that repair neurons

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Scientists create microscopic ROBOTS made from human cells that repair neurons


Scientists create microscopic ROBOTS made from human cells that repair neurons

 – opening the door to future Alzheimer’s treatment

  • These ‘anthrobots’ can be made from a person’s own cells
  • In new experiments, the microscopic bots repaired damaged nerve tissue
  • Scientists hope they will one day help people with serious health conditions 
  • READ MORE: Microscopic organisms made from frog cells assemble ‘babies’ in their Pac-Man-shaped mouths

By PETER HESS FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

Scientists have developed tiny robots using human cells that could one day patrol our bodies, searching for and healing diseased cells and tissue.

So-called ‘anthrobots,’ assembled from human cells can repair damage to brain cells in a dish, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Advanced Science.

Scientists at Tufts University in Massachusetts developed the microscopic robots to eventually heal diseases. There are multiple additional steps before that happens, but they foresee the technology repairing cell and tissue damage from conditions such as Alzheimer’s

These bots – whose name means ‘human robots’ – were made from human airway cells. 

In the future if this technology advances to the point that it can be deployed in hospitals, the fact that the bots can be made from a person’s own cells, with their own DNA, would help ensure that the body does not reject them, senior author Michael Levin told DailyMail.com.

You also would not need immunosuppressants – the kind of drugs needed after an organ transplant, said Levin, professor of biology at Tufts. 

‘You’ve got the patient’s own cells doing various things in the body that are helpful,’ he continued.

This anthrobot was made from human lung cells, coaxed into a new shape that can crawl around and repair damaged tissue

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(Source: dailymail.co.uk; November 30, 2023; https://tinyurl.com/yk8jch9c)